Tag: objections

Forced Pregnancy Is About Control over Women

Less than 20% of Americans oppose a woman’s right to control her own body. So why is the minority winning? In a democracy, where the votes of the majority elect lawmakers, how can the lawmakers pass laws that oppose the majority? This seems to happen often. Even in a democracy, the majority doesn’t control their lives, liberties, or ability to pursue happiness. Would this be different in a sociocratic democracy? (It would, of course, or… Read More . . . “Forced Pregnancy Is About Control over Women”

Sociocracy’s Achilles Heel

Painting of infant Achilles being dipped in the river Trump, Trumpism, and Trumpist In the winter, I promised to write more about Donald Trump as a democratic leader (already a difficult leap) and how things would differ in a government based on the Sociocratic Circle Method (SCM) of organization. A series of compare-and-contrast analyses that would illustrate the ways in which a sociocratic democracy would prevent or disable a Trumpist government. The  24/7 television news channels have been and still are a daily deluge… Read More . . . “Sociocracy’s Achilles Heel”

Consensus, Consent, and Objections

Heresy, I know, but I think Holacracy has a good point in using “objections” and not “consent.” Brian says in his Introduction to Holacracy video: “Consent has no place in Holacracy.” We want to hear objections to the proposal. Restrictions on Consent One of my criticisms of groups using full-group consensus is that first they commit to one for all, and all for one, then they begin putting restrictions on it. All for one and… Read More . . . “Consensus, Consent, and Objections”

Understanding Objections & Beheaviments

Translations There is a conversation on the sociocracy@yahoogroups.com list about the meaning of the word bezwaar, the Dutch word that has been translated as objection. The question is whether objection is a good translation and how other translations might affect understanding objections and consent. The translations into other languages and those in different Dutch/English dictionaries suggest something other than objection. In English, objection means no, “This decision can’t go forward.” In other languages it has… Read More . . . “Understanding Objections & Beheaviments”

“Blocks” & Vetos in Consensus Decision-Making

Picture of a Cement Block I find the word block in consensus decision-making destructive. It is particularly counter-productive when used to refer to all objections, rather than seemingly unresolvable objections. Objections do feel like blocks when after hours of discussion a person or persons will not consent — I find myself feeling this too. And sometimes when I object, in my gut I really want to block. I don’t want to argue the point, I just want to BLOCK. The… Read More . . . ““Blocks” & Vetos in Consensus Decision-Making”

Objections: Paramount, Principled, or Otherwise

In decision-making, one consents or one objects. Consent is defined as no objections. To object means no consent It’s very simple. Consent has no modifiers so why should objections? No one asks for paramount or principled consent. What would paramount consent be? Would we ask, “Are you consenting because this proposed action is the most important thing in the world right now?” Do we examine the basis on which people are consenting? No, we don’t.… Read More . . . “Objections: Paramount, Principled, or Otherwise”