Category: Leadership and Self-Organization

Sociocratic principles and practices are based on each individual developing leadership skills and sharing the responsibilities of power and decision-making  that democracy lacks. What is leadership? How do we all become leaders? How do we support leaders? How does leadership depend on  followership?

Ostrom’s Eight Rules for Successfully Governing a Commons

Elinor Ostrom, 2009 Elinor Ostrom’s Governing the Commons published in 1990 reports decades of research on community sharing. It is not a book, however, that can be recommended to everyone, perhaps not anyone who isn’t interested in a tenured position in a university. I do have it on my bookshelf and I did read it, so I speak from experience. I also had tenure at a University so I recognize the genre. As a presentation of data from… Read More . . . “Ostrom’s Eight Rules for Successfully Governing a Commons”

Policy Decisions

In order to ensure equality and freedom, the core democratic values, sociocracy requires that policy decisions be made with the consent of those delegated to implement them. Policy decisions are confusing to many people because as citizens and employees, we are rarely asked to make them. Policy decisions are those that determine how we will act in the future. How will we do this? What will guide our actions? A policy decision tells us how… Read More . . . “Policy Decisions”

Followers Make Movements

Derek Sivers on TED How to start a movement? A fabulous 3-minute video by Derek Sivers on how to start a movement. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fW8amMCVAJQ The first follower is an underestimated form of leadership in itself… The first follower is what transforms a lone nut into a leader. The leader has to have the courage to stand alone, and then make it easy to be followed, to share openly. The leader must support the first followers as equals, not as subordinates.… Read More . . . “Followers Make Movements”

Cohousing Meal Programs and Leadership

Some successful cohousing meal programs require participation by either cooking, preparing, or cleaning once every few weeks. (No one is required to eat.) But other communities that require participation in meal support still have meals infrequently. A successful program averages 3-4 meals a week and their success is often attributed to  organization and leadership. This statement is typical of those programs: We have a “meals boss” role, the Scheduler. Meals usually a major reason for… Read More . . . “Cohousing Meal Programs and Leadership”

Encouraging Self-Organization

Logo for Interaction Institute for Social Change In a workshop I conducted last Sunday, one of the participants asked, “How do you encourage self-organization?” By some miracle, probably related to my being on every mailing list on anything related to sociocracy and governance, I received in my mailbox a link to an article on the  Interaction Institute for Social Change. You guessed it on  Tips for Encouraging Self-Organization by Curtis Ogden. After some editing and additions, here are some ideas: Encouraging Self… Read More . . . “Encouraging Self-Organization”

Outside Experts on the Board of Directors

Residential communities customarily do not have board of directors members from outside the organization. Corporations normally do, but they may not be chosen by their ability to balance expertise. Non-profit organizations and independent schools often choose board members based on their ability to raise money or influence government or foundation decision-makers. Balanced Expertise Balanced expertise on the board of directors steers the organization from multiple perspectives. Balance can be achieved with experts on larger community… Read More . . . “Outside Experts on the Board of Directors”