Tag Archives: Agile

Culture Hacking & We the People

Cover of the book The Culture GameDaniel Mezick, author of The Culture Game, has compiled an intriguing list of books that discuss various approaches to changing cultures. We are happy to announce that We the People made the list. Organizations develop cultures. They communicate in specific ways, share common behavioral expectations, and value similar ideas. These are not always positive or even productive. Even when they negatively impact effectiveness and harmony, they persist. Culture hacking is changing those cultures from within the organization.

We are thrilled to be in the company of Open Space Technology, Tribal Leadership, The Culture Game, Systems Thinking: Managing Chaos and Complexity, Reality Is Broken, Delivering Happiness, The Fifth Discipline, Beyond Empowerment, The Reengineering Alternative, and many others including several titles on adopting the team approach used in Agile Software development. Agile developers have been particularly attracted to sociocracy for some time.

These books provide an understanding of cultures and describe tools and techniques for instigating change in formal and  informal organizations. Underlying culture hacking is an understanding of effective culture design.

The Definitive List of CultureHacking Books

About Daniel Mezick

Dan Mezick is a coach and adviser to executives, project sponsors, managers, and teams using Agile and Scrum. His also the author of The Culture Game: Tools for the Agile Manager
for people who hire other people and convene meeting.

The Definitive List of Culture Hacking Books

Image of BooksAt FreeStandingAgility.com, Daniel Mezick has compiled an intriguing list of books that discuss various approaches to changing cultures. All organizations develop a culture, a common language and ways of doing things. They communicate in specific ways, share common behavioral expectations, and value similar values. These are not always positive or even productive. Even when they stand in the way of effectiveness and harmony, they persist. Culture hacking is changing that culture from within the organization.

These books provide an understanding of cultures and describe tools and techniques for instigating change in formal and  informal organizations. Underlying culture hacking is an understanding of effective culture design. I’ve read some of them but  this is a new field for me and I look forward to working my way through them. If  you are also interested in understanding organization cultures, I recommend this list and invite comments. It also includes, we are happy to say, We the People: Consenting to a Deeper Democracy by John Buck and Sharon Villines.

New titles are added to the list as they emerge. A plan is afoot to also provide information in the form or ratings, rankings and reviews.

The Definitive List of CultureHacking Books

About Daniel Mezick

Dan Mezick is a coach and adviser to executives, project sponsors, managers and teams using Agile and Scrum. His consulting firm, New Technology Solutions, Inc. provides Agile training, coaching, and consulting to companies that include The Hartford Insurance companies, Siemens Corporation, Sikorsky Aircraft. He writes on Agile and Scrum for the Agile Journal, the Scrum Alliance, InfoQ. He also led the Manifesting Agility Stage of the Agile2009 conference and is the founder of Agile Boston, a regional Agile community and one of the largest Agile user groups in the USA.

His also the author of The Culture Game: Tools for the Agile Manager for those who hire people and convene meeting. “Tribal Leadership is a kind of operating system, The Culture Game is a kind of application that runs on it. This book is the first to define #culturehacking, the first to build upon the work of Tribal Leadership, and the first to state in print that #Agile builds a Senge-style learning organization.”

Aptivate, Cambridge, England, UK

“Ethical IT for International Development”

Aptivate company logoWebsite and software developers providing technical  support for international development initiatives by other non-profits, charities, NGOs, facilitators, and trainers. Aptivate provides hosting services and advice on strategy, policy, implementation and procurement and build robust, accessible and usable software, mobile and web services. Specializes in low-bandwidth solutions for the web .

Mission

Aptivate believes in the power of knowledge and communication to alleviate poverty, suffering and conflict, and in the right of every individual to inform and be informed.

We are dedicated to developing ICT services that facilitate communication for unconnected communities, empowering ordinary people across the developing world to improve their lives.

Policy Statements

Our Ethical Policy
Aptivate’s ethical policy exists to ensure we stay true to our mission. Every project we undertake should help us achieve our goals. Sometimes it is necessary to turn down a project or proposal because we feel that it does not fit into our ethical framework or does not advance our mission. We evaluate proposals against our ethical policy, and our staff collectively decide on whether the organisation should pursue them.

Our Environmental Policy
Climate change already affects the livelihoods of many people across the developing world, often the poorest and most vulnerable. Organisations such as the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change have called for significant reductions in carbon dioxide emissions and other polluting activities to avert potentially catastrophic consequences.

We believe that climate change must be considered when evaluating activities related to development. While most human activities involve some level of environmental impact, it is necessary to consider this against the perceived benefits of an activity, reduce impact where possible and find alternatives if necessary.

We are committed to reduce our own environmental impact by:

  • using alternatives to travel, such as conferencing technology;
  • using alternative means of transport to short-haul flights;
  • shutting down IT systems when not in use;
  • investigating ways to mitigate the pollution generated by the manufacture, running and disposal of IT equipment;
  • recycling or re-using all possible office consumables;
  • engaging with other organisations on the issue of climate change.

Nathaniel Whitestone of Decision Lab transformed their “decision-making by endurance” in which those how couldn’t last all night had no voice by implementing over a three year period a sociocratic design with formal processes and decentralized power.

Changing the World by Changing the Way We Make Decisions“, AxiomNews. Accessed 8 Aug 2011. Features an interview with Nathan Whitestone of Decision Lab.