Tag Archives: hierarchy Hierarchies

A hierarchy is the arrangement of a set of entities. It is used in biology to organize trees, insects, etc., into related groupings with specific characteristics. In the governance of organizations it is used to organize decision-making, management, and production. There are many forms of hierarchies: circular, autocratic, democratic, sociocratic, horizontal, etc. The one with which most people identify as a “hierarchy” is an autocratic hierarchy.

Inclusion and Hierarchies: New Articles on Zappos

Three new articles discussing inclusion and hierarchies, and other issues raised by the Zappos adoption of Holacracy. These are real articles examining the pros and cons of the promises of Holacracy and sociocracy, not reactions or quotes from press releases.

1. Andrew Hill of The Financial Times: Zappos and the Collapse of Corporate Hierarchies.

2.  A response from Norman Pickavance of Blueprint for Better Business in Linton, N. Yorks, UK: The Four Levels of Decision-Making.

3. Sally Helgesen, author of The Web of Inclusion: Architecture for Building Great Organizations (2005 reprint of 1995 edition) on the Strategy+Business site: An Extreme Take on Restructuring: No Job Titles?

We desperately need professional, published accounts with full measurements of organizations that have adopted sociocracy. That’s what business people need before they pay attention. Scientifically acceptable measurements. Peer-reviewed and published. 

 

Rainbow Community School, Asheville, NC

Logo Rainbow Community SchoolA hierarchy is very efficient. For example, during a crisis, a leader can issue life-saving orders; but it comes with inherent problems. In addition to the equitability issues involved with a hierarchical structure, innovative ideas from the bottom of the hierarchy don’t make their way to the top, creating stagnation. On the other hand, a grassroots approach, where all individuals have equal voice and power, creates a lot of great ideas, but typically lacks the efficiency to be highly productive; especially in a school where teachers can end up with overwhelming administrative responsibilities and “political” concerns in addition to their classroom duties. Dynamic Governance is a sophisticated “both/and” approach to structuring an organization. It makes appropriate use of the efficiency of a hierarchy, yet at specific times the hierarchy dissolves and everyone has an equal voice for making decisions by consent. Dynamic Governance, if instituted adeptly, melts toxicity, and gives everyone the motivation, power, and tools to be highly innovative and productive. It’s truly the best of both worlds.

Renee Owen, Educating the Innovation Generation, Part IV: how Can Schools Create an Innovative Culture. 13 March 2014. Renee Owen is Executive Director of The Rainbow Community School in Asheville, North Carolina, (Formerly the Mountain School, established in 1977). Rainbow emphasizes Seven Domains: Spiritual, Mental, Creative, Emotional, Social, Natural, and Physical which represent the colors of the rainbow.

Is a Family a Hierarchy?

How does equality and freedom work in a family when a child’s ability to make decisions without harming themselves or others is inherently unequal? How can a family apply sociocratic principles if children cannot consent to the decisions that affect them? Can a family be a hierarchy and still be nurturing or does it have to be a hierarchy in order to be nurturing?

Most people agree that children are not born with the ability to make the decisions necessary for them to live safely and well. For children to be successful as adults, they need parental guidance, or the guidance of other adults in their lives. Is this a hierarchical relationship? If so, how does the child grow out of it? When do the children become free and equal? And how?

Systems Definition of Hierarchy

A definition of hierarchy that I find very useful is from  Thinking in Systems by Donella H. Meadows. It is a small book, very accessible, and an excellent introduction to systems thinking.

  • Hierarchical systems evolve from the bottom up. The purpose of the upper layers is to serve the purposes of the lower.
  • Systems are often self organizing, meaning they have the ability to structure themselves and to create new structures. To learn, diversify, and complexify.
  • Systems need to be managed for resilience, not just for productivity or stability.
  • There are always limits to resilience.

By analogy, applying Donella Meadows’ characteristics of a hierarchy to the family, the responsibility of the parents would be:

  • Serving the purposes of the children, which is to become independent, self-supporting adults, leading satisfying lives.
  • Teaching them to self-organize meaning to learn, diversify, and become more complex.
  • Teaching them to be resilient, not just productive and stable, and
  • Teaching them to understand that they are human, there are limits to resilience.

As a guide for parenting I think that works very well. It also establishes the purpose of a hierarchy in a family system. It points the hierarchy toward the development of self-organizing systems, toward enabling children to create new family structures, new hierarchies. The understanding of sociocratic principles would be helpful in managing the process of parenting self-organizing children. (Who clean their rooms, sometimes.)